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  1. #1
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    I am not ashamed to say that Trump's speech brought tears to my eyes. It is one of the finest speeches I've ever heard delivered and a great tribute to the Americans who 75 years ago sacrificed so much that others, who they did not know, might breathe free. Inspiring whether you like the man or not.


    President Macron, Mrs. Macron, and the people of France, to the First Lady of the United States, and members of the United States Congress, to distinguished guests, veterans and my fellow Americans.

    We are gathered here on freedom's altar, on these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood, and thousands sacrificed their lives for their brothers, for their countries, and for the survival of liberty.

    Today we remember those who fell and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They wouldn't back this ground for civilization. To more than one 170 Veterans of the Second World War, who join us today, you are among the very greatest Americans who will ever live. You are the pride of our nation. You are the glory of our republic. And we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

    Here with you are over 60 veterans who landed on D-Day. Our debt to you is everlasting. Today we express our undying gratitude. When you were young, these men enlisted their lives in a great crusade - one of the greatest of all times. Their mission is the story of an epic battle and a ferocious eternal struggle between good and evil. On the 6th of June, 1944, they joined a liberation force of awesome power and breathtaking scale.

    After months of planning, the Allies had chosen this ancient coastline to mount their campaign to vanquish the wicked tyranny of the Nazi empire from the face of the earth.

    The battle began in the skies above us. In those first tense midnight hours, 1,000 aircraft roared overhead, with 17,000 allied airborne troops preparing to leap into the dark just beyond these trees. Then came dawn. The enemy who had occupied these heights saw the largest naval armada in the history of the world.

    Just a few miles offshore, were 7,000 vessels bearing 130,000 warriors. They were the citizens of free and independent nations united by their duty to their compatriots, and to millions yet unborn.

    There were the British, whose nobility and fortitude saw them through the worst of Dunkirk and the London Blitz. The full violence of Nazi fury was no match for the full grandeur of British pride. Thank you.

    There were the Canadians, whose robust sense of honor and loyalty compelled them to take up arms alongside Britain from the very, very beginning.

    There were the fighting Poles, the tough Norwegians, and the Intrepid Aussies. There were the gallant French commandos soon to be met by thousands of their brave countrymen ready to write a new chapter in the long history of French valor.

    And finally, there were the Americans.

    They came from the farms of a vast heartland, the streets of glowing cities in the forges of mighty industrial towns. Before the war, many had never ventured beyond their own community. Now they had come to offer their lives half a world from home.

    This beach, code named Omaha, was defended by the Nazis with monstrous firepower, thousands and thousands of mines and spikes driven into the sands so deeply. It was here that tens of thousands of the Americans came. The G.I's who boarded the landing craft that morning knew that they carried on their shoulders not just the pack of a soldier, but the fate of the world.

    Colonel George Taylor, whose 16th infantry regiment would join in the first wave, was asked what would happen if the Germans stopped them, right then and there, cold on the beach, just stopped them. What would happen? This great American replied, "Why the 18th Infantry is coming in right behind us, the 26th infantry will come on too. Then there is the 2nd Infantry Division, already afloat, and the 9th Division and the 2nd Armored and the 3rd Armored, and all the rest. Maybe the 16th won't make it. But someone will".

    One of those men, in Taylor's 16th regiment, was Army medic Ray Lambert. Ray was only 23 but he had already earned three Purple Hearts and two Silver Stars fighting in North Africa and Sicily.

    Where he and his brother Bill, no longer with us, served side by side. In the early morning hours, the two brothers stood together on the deck of the USS Henrico, before boarding two separate Higgins landing craft.

    "If I don't make it," Bill said, "please, please take care of my family". Ray asked his brother to do the same.

    Of the 31 men on Ray's landing craft, only Ray and six others made it to the beach. There were only a few of them left. They came to the sector right here below us. Easy Red it was called. Again and again, Ray ran back into the water. He dragged out one man after another. He was shot through the arm, his leg was ripped open by shrapnel, his back was broken, he nearly drowned, he had been on the beach for hours bleeding and saving lives. When he finally lost consciousness, he woke up the next day on a cot, beside another badly wounded soldier. He looked over, and saw his brother Bill. They made it. They made it. They made it. At 98-years-old, Ray is here with us today, with his fourth Purple Heart and his third Silver Star. From Omaha, Ray, the free world salutes you. Thank you Ray.

    Nearly two hours in, unrelenting fire from these bluffs kept the Americans pinned down on the sand, now red, with our heroes' blood.

    Then, just a few hundred yards from where I'm standing, a breakthrough came. The battle turned, and with it, history.

    Down on the beach. Captain Joe Dawson, the son of a Texas preacher, led Company G through a minefield to a natural fold, in the hillside still here.

    Just beyond this path to my right. Captain Dawson snuck beneath an enemy machine gun perch, and tossed his grenades. Soon, American troops were charging up "Dawson's draw". What a job he did. What bravery he showed. Lieutenant Spaulding and the men from Company E moved on to crush the enemy strong point on the far side of this cemetery and stop the slaughter on the beach below.

    Countless more Americans poured out across this ground all over the countryside. They joined fellow American warriors from Utah Beach, and allies from Juneau, Sword and Gold, along with the airborne and the French patriots.

    Private First Class Russell Pickett, of the 29th division's famed 116 Infantry Regiment had been wounded in the first wave that landed on Omaha Beach.

    At a hospital in England private Pickett vowed to return to battle. "I'm going to return," he said. "I'm going to return".

    Six days after D-Day. He rejoined his company. Two-thirds had been killed already. Many had been wounded, within 15 minutes of the invasion. They lost 19 just from the small town of Bedford, Virginia alone. Before long, a grenade left private Pickett and he was gravely wounded. So badly wounded.

    Again he chose to return. He didn't care. He had to be here. He was then wounded a third time and laid unconscious for 12 days. They thought he was gone. They felt he had no chance. Russell Pickett. Is the last known survivor of the legendary Company A. And today, believe it or not, he has returned once more to these shores to be with his comrades.

    Private Pickett, you honor us all, with your presence. Tough guy.

    By the fourth week of August, Paris was liberated.

    Some who landed here pushed all the way to the center of Germany. Some threw open the gates of Nazi concentration camps to liberate Jews who had suffered the bottomless horrors of the Holocaust.

    And some warriors fell on other fields of battle returning to rest on this soil for eternity.

    Before this place was consecrated to history, the land was owned by a French farmer, a member of the French Resistance. These were great people. These were strong and tough people. His terrified wife waited out D-Day in a nearby house holding tight to their little baby girl.

    The next day a soldier appeared. "I'm an American," he said. "I'm here to help". The French woman was overcome with emotion and cried. Days later, she laid flowers on fresh American graves. Today her granddaughter Stephanie serves as a guide at this cemetery. This week. Stephanie led 92-year-old Marion Wynn of California to see the grave of her brother Don for the very first time. Marion and Stephanie are both with us today. And we thank you for keeping alive the memories of our precious heroes. Thank you.

    9,388 young Americans rest beneath the white crosses and Stars of David, laid on these beautiful grounds. Each one has been adopted by a French family that thinks of him as their own. They come from all over France to look after our boys. They kneel, they cry, they pray, they place flowers and they never forget. Today, America embraces the French people and thanks you for honoring our beloved dead. Thank you.

    To all of our friends and partners, our cherished alliance was forged in the heat of battle, tested in the trials of war, and proven in the blessings of peace. Our bond is unbreakable.

    From across the Earth, Americans are drawn to this place as though it were a part of our very soul. We come not only because of what they did here, we come because of who they were. They were young men with their entire lives before them. They were husbands who said goodbye to their young brides and took their duty as their fate. They were fathers who would never meet their infant sons and daughters because they had a job to do, and with God as their witness, they were going to get it done.

    They came wave after wave without question, without hesitation, and without complaint. More powerful than the strength of American arms was the strength of American hearts. These men ran through the fires of Hell, moved by a force no weapon could destroy. The fierce patriotism of a free, proud and sovereign people.

    They battled, not for control and domination, but for liberty, democracy, and self-rule. They pressed on for love and home and country, the main streets, the schoolyards, the churches and neighbors and families and communities that gave us men such as these. They were sustained by the confidence that America can do anything, because we are a noble nation, with a virtuous people, praying to a righteous God. The exceptional might came from a truly exceptional spirit. The abundance of courage came from an abundance of faith.

    The great deeds of an army came from the great depths of their love as they confronted their fate, the Americans and the Allies placed themselves into the palm of God's hand. The men behind will tell you that they are just the lucky ones, as one of them recently put it, "all the heroes are buried here". But we know what these men did, we knew how brave they were, they came here and saved freedom, and then they went home and showed us all what freedom is all about.

    The American sons and daughters who saw us to victory were no less extraordinary in peace. They built families, they built industries, they built a national culture that inspired the entire world in the decades that followed, America defeated Communism, secured Civil Rights, revolutionized science, launched a man to the Moon and then kept on pushing to new frontiers - and today America is stronger than ever before.

    Seven decades ago, the warriors of D-Day fought a sinister enemy who spoke a 1,000-year empire. In defeating that evil, they left a legacy that will last, not only fo1,000 years, but for all time. For as long as the soul knows for duty and for honor, for as long as freedom keeps its hold on the human heart.

    To the men who sit behind me and to the boys who rest in the field before, your example will never, ever grow old. Your legend will never die, your spirit, brave, unyielding and true, will never die. The blood that they spilled, the tears that they shed, the lives that they gave, the sacrifice that they made, did not just win a battle. It did not just win a war. Those who fought here won a future for our nation. They won the survival of our civilization, and they showed us the way to love, cherish and defend our way of life for many centuries to come.

    Today as we stand together upon this sacred earth, we pledge that our nations will forever be strong and united. We will forever be together, our people will forever be bold, our hearts will forever be loyal, and our children and their children will forever, and always be free. May God bless our great Veterans, may God bless our allies, may God bless the heroes of D-Day, and may God bless America. Thank you. Thank you very much
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  2. #2
    No More Clowns
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by Rickrides View Post
    I am not ashamed to say that Trump's speech brought tears to my eyes. It is one of the finest speeches I've ever heard delivered and a great tribute to the Americans who 75 years ago sacrificed so much that others, who they did not know, might breathe free. Inspiring whether you like the man or not.


    President Macron, Mrs. Macron, and the people of France, to the First Lady of the United States, and members of the United States Congress, to distinguished guests, veterans and my fellow Americans.

    We are gathered here on freedom's altar, on these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood, and thousands sacrificed their lives for their brothers, for their countries, and for the survival of liberty.

    Today we remember those who fell and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They wouldn't back this ground for civilization. To more than one 170 Veterans of the Second World War, who join us today, you are among the very greatest Americans who will ever live. You are the pride of our nation. You are the glory of our republic. And we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

    Here with you are over 60 veterans who landed on D-Day. Our debt to you is everlasting. Today we express our undying gratitude. When you were young, these men enlisted their lives in a great crusade - one of the greatest of all times. Their mission is the story of an epic battle and a ferocious eternal struggle between good and evil. On the 6th of June, 1944, they joined a liberation force of awesome power and breathtaking scale.

    After months of planning, the Allies had chosen this ancient coastline to mount their campaign to vanquish the wicked tyranny of the Nazi empire from the face of the earth.

    The battle began in the skies above us. In those first tense midnight hours, 1,000 aircraft roared overhead, with 17,000 allied airborne troops preparing to leap into the dark just beyond these trees. Then came dawn. The enemy who had occupied these heights saw the largest naval armada in the history of the world.

    Just a few miles offshore, were 7,000 vessels bearing 130,000 warriors. They were the citizens of free and independent nations united by their duty to their compatriots, and to millions yet unborn.

    There were the British, whose nobility and fortitude saw them through the worst of Dunkirk and the London Blitz. The full violence of Nazi fury was no match for the full grandeur of British pride. Thank you.

    There were the Canadians, whose robust sense of honor and loyalty compelled them to take up arms alongside Britain from the very, very beginning.

    There were the fighting Poles, the tough Norwegians, and the Intrepid Aussies. There were the gallant French commandos soon to be met by thousands of their brave countrymen ready to write a new chapter in the long history of French valor.

    And finally, there were the Americans.

    They came from the farms of a vast heartland, the streets of glowing cities in the forges of mighty industrial towns. Before the war, many had never ventured beyond their own community. Now they had come to offer their lives half a world from home.

    This beach, code named Omaha, was defended by the Nazis with monstrous firepower, thousands and thousands of mines and spikes driven into the sands so deeply. It was here that tens of thousands of the Americans came. The G.I's who boarded the landing craft that morning knew that they carried on their shoulders not just the pack of a soldier, but the fate of the world.

    Colonel George Taylor, whose 16th infantry regiment would join in the first wave, was asked what would happen if the Germans stopped them, right then and there, cold on the beach, just stopped them. What would happen? This great American replied, "Why the 18th Infantry is coming in right behind us, the 26th infantry will come on too. Then there is the 2nd Infantry Division, already afloat, and the 9th Division and the 2nd Armored and the 3rd Armored, and all the rest. Maybe the 16th won't make it. But someone will".

    One of those men, in Taylor's 16th regiment, was Army medic Ray Lambert. Ray was only 23 but he had already earned three Purple Hearts and two Silver Stars fighting in North Africa and Sicily.

    Where he and his brother Bill, no longer with us, served side by side. In the early morning hours, the two brothers stood together on the deck of the USS Henrico, before boarding two separate Higgins landing craft.

    "If I don't make it," Bill said, "please, please take care of my family". Ray asked his brother to do the same.

    Of the 31 men on Ray's landing craft, only Ray and six others made it to the beach. There were only a few of them left. They came to the sector right here below us. Easy Red it was called. Again and again, Ray ran back into the water. He dragged out one man after another. He was shot through the arm, his leg was ripped open by shrapnel, his back was broken, he nearly drowned, he had been on the beach for hours bleeding and saving lives. When he finally lost consciousness, he woke up the next day on a cot, beside another badly wounded soldier. He looked over, and saw his brother Bill. They made it. They made it. They made it. At 98-years-old, Ray is here with us today, with his fourth Purple Heart and his third Silver Star. From Omaha, Ray, the free world salutes you. Thank you Ray.

    Nearly two hours in, unrelenting fire from these bluffs kept the Americans pinned down on the sand, now red, with our heroes' blood.

    Then, just a few hundred yards from where I'm standing, a breakthrough came. The battle turned, and with it, history.

    Down on the beach. Captain Joe Dawson, the son of a Texas preacher, led Company G through a minefield to a natural fold, in the hillside still here.

    Just beyond this path to my right. Captain Dawson snuck beneath an enemy machine gun perch, and tossed his grenades. Soon, American troops were charging up "Dawson's draw". What a job he did. What bravery he showed. Lieutenant Spaulding and the men from Company E moved on to crush the enemy strong point on the far side of this cemetery and stop the slaughter on the beach below.

    Countless more Americans poured out across this ground all over the countryside. They joined fellow American warriors from Utah Beach, and allies from Juneau, Sword and Gold, along with the airborne and the French patriots.

    Private First Class Russell Pickett, of the 29th division's famed 116 Infantry Regiment had been wounded in the first wave that landed on Omaha Beach.

    At a hospital in England private Pickett vowed to return to battle. "I'm going to return," he said. "I'm going to return".

    Six days after D-Day. He rejoined his company. Two-thirds had been killed already. Many had been wounded, within 15 minutes of the invasion. They lost 19 just from the small town of Bedford, Virginia alone. Before long, a grenade left private Pickett and he was gravely wounded. So badly wounded.

    Again he chose to return. He didn't care. He had to be here. He was then wounded a third time and laid unconscious for 12 days. They thought he was gone. They felt he had no chance. Russell Pickett. Is the last known survivor of the legendary Company A. And today, believe it or not, he has returned once more to these shores to be with his comrades.

    Private Pickett, you honor us all, with your presence. Tough guy.

    By the fourth week of August, Paris was liberated.

    Some who landed here pushed all the way to the center of Germany. Some threw open the gates of Nazi concentration camps to liberate Jews who had suffered the bottomless horrors of the Holocaust.

    And some warriors fell on other fields of battle returning to rest on this soil for eternity.

    Before this place was consecrated to history, the land was owned by a French farmer, a member of the French Resistance. These were great people. These were strong and tough people. His terrified wife waited out D-Day in a nearby house holding tight to their little baby girl.

    The next day a soldier appeared. "I'm an American," he said. "I'm here to help". The French woman was overcome with emotion and cried. Days later, she laid flowers on fresh American graves. Today her granddaughter Stephanie serves as a guide at this cemetery. This week. Stephanie led 92-year-old Marion Wynn of California to see the grave of her brother Don for the very first time. Marion and Stephanie are both with us today. And we thank you for keeping alive the memories of our precious heroes. Thank you.

    9,388 young Americans rest beneath the white crosses and Stars of David, laid on these beautiful grounds. Each one has been adopted by a French family that thinks of him as their own. They come from all over France to look after our boys. They kneel, they cry, they pray, they place flowers and they never forget. Today, America embraces the French people and thanks you for honoring our beloved dead. Thank you.

    To all of our friends and partners, our cherished alliance was forged in the heat of battle, tested in the trials of war, and proven in the blessings of peace. Our bond is unbreakable.

    From across the Earth, Americans are drawn to this place as though it were a part of our very soul. We come not only because of what they did here, we come because of who they were. They were young men with their entire lives before them. They were husbands who said goodbye to their young brides and took their duty as their fate. They were fathers who would never meet their infant sons and daughters because they had a job to do, and with God as their witness, they were going to get it done.

    They came wave after wave without question, without hesitation, and without complaint. More powerful than the strength of American arms was the strength of American hearts. These men ran through the fires of Hell, moved by a force no weapon could destroy. The fierce patriotism of a free, proud and sovereign people.

    They battled, not for control and domination, but for liberty, democracy, and self-rule. They pressed on for love and home and country, the main streets, the schoolyards, the churches and neighbors and families and communities that gave us men such as these. They were sustained by the confidence that America can do anything, because we are a noble nation, with a virtuous people, praying to a righteous God. The exceptional might came from a truly exceptional spirit. The abundance of courage came from an abundance of faith.

    The great deeds of an army came from the great depths of their love as they confronted their fate, the Americans and the Allies placed themselves into the palm of God's hand. The men behind will tell you that they are just the lucky ones, as one of them recently put it, "all the heroes are buried here". But we know what these men did, we knew how brave they were, they came here and saved freedom, and then they went home and showed us all what freedom is all about.

    The American sons and daughters who saw us to victory were no less extraordinary in peace. They built families, they built industries, they built a national culture that inspired the entire world in the decades that followed, America defeated Communism, secured Civil Rights, revolutionized science, launched a man to the Moon and then kept on pushing to new frontiers - and today America is stronger than ever before.

    Seven decades ago, the warriors of D-Day fought a sinister enemy who spoke a 1,000-year empire. In defeating that evil, they left a legacy that will last, not only fo1,000 years, but for all time. For as long as the soul knows for duty and for honor, for as long as freedom keeps its hold on the human heart.

    To the men who sit behind me and to the boys who rest in the field before, your example will never, ever grow old. Your legend will never die, your spirit, brave, unyielding and true, will never die. The blood that they spilled, the tears that they shed, the lives that they gave, the sacrifice that they made, did not just win a battle. It did not just win a war. Those who fought here won a future for our nation. They won the survival of our civilization, and they showed us the way to love, cherish and defend our way of life for many centuries to come.

    Today as we stand together upon this sacred earth, we pledge that our nations will forever be strong and united. We will forever be together, our people will forever be bold, our hearts will forever be loyal, and our children and their children will forever, and always be free. May God bless our great Veterans, may God bless our allies, may God bless the heroes of D-Day, and may God bless America. Thank you. Thank you very much
    CLOWNS ARE MY FAVORITE..



    ZRXOA# 8889


    "I'd rather be riding my motorcycle thinking about God than sitting in church thinking about my motorcycle."
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    "Feb. 22 '05" and a single word, "counselor"

    Current 2016 BMW S1000XR
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  3. #3
    Weirdly Peculiar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Where am I?

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Wow. Just Wow. Yes, tears. So many brave courageous men. A heartfelt speech.
    2000 Green, 1109, Mikuni 38mm TMR-MJN's, Yosh pipe, ZX-11 cams, Pods, ZX-11 Ignitor, Kwick Kill, Tealdo Stick Coils, Wyn's Sprocket Cover, Ted's Battery Out, MonkeyPincher Rack

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    He who is right all the time is never always right.

  4. #4
    BadAss Hooligan
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Birmingham, AL

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Spot on Rickriders and well stared... had tears myself and proud to say I did.

    THANKS to all who served there, lost their lives and for their families.

    Thank you for posting

    GOD BLESS AMERICA

    Wayne

  5. #5
    I used to be....
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Auburn, AL

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Thanks for posting

  6. #6
    The Mod Father
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Lisburn.,Northern Ireland

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    My Goodness What a speech.!!! ...What an absolutely Incredible Speech.!! .....just immense.!!

    Moving.,humbling.,stirring.,and inspiring.!!

    I have copied and pasted it on my Facebook page just now..

    We... (I..) will never forget.!

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart....
    Last edited by BG Wells; 06-06-2019 at 01:00 PM.
    "A change in behaviour begins when Jesus changes our heart "

    Carina Wells (Mum)
    RIP.

    April 2017 BOTM~2017 BOTY
    August 2019 BOTM..
    #10080

  7. #7
    Color Monitor
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    The Speech.




    TG
    TGHW
    ZRXOA #5590
    Welcome to Wisconsin....Come smell our Dairy air !!


  8. #8
    BadAss Hooligan
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Silver Spring Md.

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    I hope we are worthy of their sacrifice.
    Signature deleted until pithy non-political one can be formulated.

  9. #9
    Hooligan
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    North Carolina

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    I didn't hear it but I might have welled up a bit reading it. Thank You for sharing!!

  10. #10
    2009 Hooligan of the year
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Austin, TX

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Very moving speech. Thanks for the post. Reading it allowed me to give more thought to what was being said.

  11. #11
    Mouthy Mofo
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The frozen north, Alberta, Canada

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Great speech.

    Must have stuck to the notes.
    Silver REXs are sooo subtle - they slide right under the enemy's radar, then WHAM - they're dead!

    03 REX - Akra, K&N pods, Ivan's jets, Teds Advancer, airbox out and chainguard, Chrispy's mirrors, Biscuits rearsets, Greg's brace, Armz shift linkage, Wog's seat, 'n some other stuff

    84 KZ1100R - Yosh, K&N, fork brace
    82 GPz 550 - Hindle

    ZRXOA #5764


  12. #12
    The Mod Father
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Lisburn.,Northern Ireland

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by MADZRXMATT View Post
    I hope we are worthy of their sacrifice.
    Very true and sobering to consider as we look at ourselves and how we behave toward each other....and what we place our values on.
    Last edited by BG Wells; 06-06-2019 at 01:08 PM.
    "A change in behaviour begins when Jesus changes our heart "

    Carina Wells (Mum)
    RIP.

    April 2017 BOTM~2017 BOTY
    August 2019 BOTM..
    #10080

  13. #13
    President of the ZRXOA
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA

    TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    God bless our troops and all those who gave the ultimate sacrifice on those beaches.

    Arash (pronounced "our-ash")

    CAUTION - My forum posts may be worth what you paid for them!

    2005 Green RessuREXtion - Amateur 1224 & Six Speed Installation - Oct 2015 BOTM - Yamaha R6 - Aprilia RS250s

  14. #14
    Mainely here
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Maine

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Phew.... took the wind out of me there for a sec.

    Outstanding!

  15. #15
    Father Joe
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Burpinham, Babalama

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    As I was driving late this morning my local talk radio station made mention of it. Then paused. Then she said "O.K. It's cued up? Great. Here's President Trump's speech at Normandy."

    OH MY GOODNESS. "......on freedom's altar....."
    Last edited by McGovZRX; 06-06-2019 at 01:23 PM.
    I'm not completely useless. I can always be used as a bad example.

    The People's rear loading pink Beach Bomb.

    Kwackifoofoo

  16. #16
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by MADZRXMATT View Post
    I hope we are worthy of their sacrifice.
    The question that comes to my mind is, if the Nazis had risen to power in 2014, would Americans today do what Americans did in 1944? The war might be different due to advances in weaponry, but the fight of good vs. evil would be no different than it was during WWII. Mankind would still be at a crossroads.

    WWII was not just D-Day for Americans. It was about years of sacrifice not only on the battlefield but also at home. Food, gas, tires, shoes, virtuallyeverything was rationed to support the war effort. There were "pot metal" drives where people donated all kinds of things to the war effort. Women had to go to work in the factories making aircraft, tanks, etc. There were volunteer civilian "air raid" wardens who, even in the mid-west, manned watch towers to search the skies for enemy planes (that one's kind of funny, actually). I mean, it was simply a massive effort that impacted virtually every American's everyday life in ways that were unprecedented and not convenient.

    The war on radical Islam that we've been involved in since 9/11/01 has involved far fewer Americans. Bush told us to go out to the malls and get on with our lives. In a way, I think that was a mistake as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq never really have impacted Americans or been on their radar. It's really fallen on our professional military and the reserves to fight those wars and, therefore, far fewer families are impacted on a day to day basis. So, I don't think we have the same sense of purpose as we did in WWII when virtually every American was involved in the war effort and we had a very clear purpose. Today's wars just drag on with no idea of what victory will look like. In WWII, victory looked like the Japanese surrendering on the deck of the USS Missouri (coincidentally the President's home state). In both Europe and Asia, there was no doubt about which side prevailed--good. Well, maybe not for eastern Europe because the USSR wasn't much kinder than Germany had been.

    Because it might be perceived by some as political, I won't even get into whether this generation of Americans would be willing to disembark a Higgins boat into a hail of machine gun and mortar fire. Those that are in the military--all volunteers--probably would do their duty. But they represent only a tiny minority of this generation of young Americans so who knows? There was no "safe space" on Omaha beach.
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  17. #17
    President of the ZRXOA
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    Pleasanton, CA

    TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Thank you Rick. We don’t want to go there.

    Paying respect to our troops and fallen heroes is always welcome.
    Last edited by AV80R; 06-06-2019 at 02:16 PM.
    Arash (pronounced "our-ash")

    CAUTION - My forum posts may be worth what you paid for them!

    2005 Green RessuREXtion - Amateur 1224 & Six Speed Installation - Oct 2015 BOTM - Yamaha R6 - Aprilia RS250s

  18. #18
    Badass Hooligan
    Join Date
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    Springfield, Mo.

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Those BOYS, stormed that beach, the courage, the terror, the drive to keep us free. The GREATEST GENERATION indeed. My uncle Carl a few weeks later took 3 8mm rounds in the gut but survived to raise a great family. His haunting stories will be with me forever.
    Thanks for the thread Rick
    "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."-Benjamin Franklin

  19. #19
    BadAss Hooligan
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Birmingham, AL

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by MADZRXMATT View Post
    I hope we are worthy of their sacrifice.
    IMO some are not that's for sure!

    Wayne

  20. #20
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Thank you Rick. We don’t want to go there.

    Paying respect to our troops and fallen hero’s is always welcome.

    No problem, Chief.

    It is, however, an interesting question. I mean, can you picture a bunch of 18-20 year-olds in a landing craft today texting each other on their cell phones or playing "Wolfenstein: The New Order" on their way to Omaha beach?

    My youngest is in the Army with 7th Group SF. And I know he'd be playing Wolfenstein--though he would be in the landing craft.
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  21. #21
    President of the ZRXOA
    Join Date
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    Pleasanton, CA

    TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by Rickrides View Post
    No problem, Chief.

    It is, however, an interesting question. I mean, can you picture a bunch of 18-20 year-olds in a landing craft today texting each other on their cell phones or playing "Wolfenstein: The New Order" on their way to Omaha beach?

    My youngest is in the Army with 7th Group SF. And I know he'd be playing Wolfenstein--though he would be in the landing craft.
    Remind me in Kernville to tell you a story about this exact thing!





    What team is your youngest on? PM if you like...

    The whole team naming scheme was screwed up when they added another company but the below is the team my brother eventually led later in his career. I think 782 is now 7322...

    He’s a big Run-D.M.C. fan and had these shirts made for his guys LOL

    Last edited by AV80R; 06-06-2019 at 02:29 PM.
    Arash (pronounced "our-ash")

    CAUTION - My forum posts may be worth what you paid for them!

    2005 Green RessuREXtion - Amateur 1224 & Six Speed Installation - Oct 2015 BOTM - Yamaha R6 - Aprilia RS250s

  22. #22
    BadAss Hooligan
    Join Date
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    Ft. Lauderdale, now Tallahassee,FL #4835

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY


  23. #23
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    What team is your youngest on? PM if you like...
    He's not on a team as he did not do the Q course. He's a paratrooper but his MOS is photo/journalist and he's assigned to 7th Gp. So, he takes pics and video of them doing cool stuff.

    Before changing MOS, he was a HVAC tech with 1st Gp.

    So, he's happy to be with SF.
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  24. #24
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Remind me in Kernville to tell you a story about this exact thing!
    That's the nose art from the B-17 "Memphis Belle." Built that model more than once!
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  25. #25
    Bleeding Kawasaki since the 70's
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Charleston, TN -- bah-ha-wa-ha!

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Reading that makes me realize ........... we need to HTFU as a nation because compared to those who came before us we pussies.

    SS
    For all the members we've lost - this board can only hope to help you live on in others. YTRAP, itchy butt, Gary1129, Mavwrek, Mitch#101 and all the others you are forever remembered.
    I have been to HELL. A loft with John T on one side and SS on the other That was a cataclysmic snore fest, weakening the tectonic plates Georgia rests upon!!!!
    YTRAP 2/23/05

    Quote Originally Posted by youngzrxer View Post
    Perko has a good point though....

  26. #26
    I'm Canadian!
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Milton, Ontario

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by Perko View Post
    Reading that makes me realize ........... we need to HTFU as a nation because compared to those who came before us we pussies.

    SS
    Applies to many nations including mine.

    Toronto District School Board just made it ok for kids to keep their hats on during the national anthem.

    Path of least resistance for these idiots. Guess it's too tough on them to have teachers tell them to take their hats off.

    Parents seemed to be all for it. Idiots, have just a tiny bit of respect, just a tiny bit.

    Surprised they just didn't stop playing the anthem.

    Pops
    Last edited by Pops; 06-06-2019 at 04:34 PM.
    Size matters, good thing I drive a huge bus.

  27. #27
    President of the ZRXOA
    Join Date
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    Pleasanton, CA

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by Rickrides View Post
    He's not on a team as he did not do the Q course. He's a paratrooper but his MOS is photo/journalist and he's assigned to 7th Gp. So, he takes pics and video of them doing cool stuff.

    Before changing MOS, he was a HVAC tech with 1st Gp.

    So, he's happy to be with SF.
    So awesome. Thank him for his service for me/us
    Arash (pronounced "our-ash")

    CAUTION - My forum posts may be worth what you paid for them!

    2005 Green RessuREXtion - Amateur 1224 & Six Speed Installation - Oct 2015 BOTM - Yamaha R6 - Aprilia RS250s

  28. #28
    Thinking, So You Don't Have To
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    The Inland Empire (not as ominous as it sounds)

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Quote Originally Posted by AV80R View Post
    So awesome. Thank him for his service for me/us
    Will do, Arash, thanks! He is the only one of his generation from the offspring of my four brothers and I to serve. Makes me very proud.

    My great-great grandfather, Lafayette McCarty, served with the Union in the Civil War. My Granddad, Donovan McCarty, served with the US Army in WWI and landed in France the day the Armistice was signed and then served in the reserves in WWII; Paternal grandfather Alfred Hall served US Navy in WWII. Dad was an officer in USAF '53-'56 and I served in the US Army '74-'77. So my son is continuing a long line of those who have served.
    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry, American patriot.

    "Red is faster of course" 8/5/19 Ca Pete acknowledges the obvious.

  29. #29
    Born In The USA
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Redding, CA.

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    Great speech!
    You'll never know how fast you can go, until you go too fast.

    I have discovered that half of being a good rebel is knowing what to rebel against.



    2014 Ninja 1000

    2005 ZX10

    1981 GPz550

  30. #30
    Super Moderator
    I is Approving Stuff

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    SoCal: Splitting Lanes Since 1968...

    Re: TRUMP'S SPEECH TODAY IN NORMANDY

    That is a great speech.


    .


    Sometimes I forget people can see me make the jerk off motion when they're talking to me...


 

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